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Nomentano - a quiet and unassuming suburb within the city

Vibe on the street: friendly, sociable, residential.
Famous for: green spaces, such as Villa Torlonia, and being a favourite haunt for socialising locals on warm evenings (notably Piazza Bologna).
Nomentano - a quiet and unassuming suburb within the city
  • Though developed at the turn of the 19th century, Nomentano is a neighbourhood replete with sights, monuments and museums documenting the history of Rome from its 753 BC founding to present day. The residential area is able to entertain all walks of life from young to old, sporty to cultural, family to single. There is something for everyone in Nomentano.

    Nearby sights

    Nomentano has a cache of cultural sights and monuments for all ages. The expansive Villa Torlonia complex includes an 18th-century villa that was home to a Roman noble family and later to Benito Mussolini. The villa is now a museum with an art collection. The entire complex includes the Casina delle Civette - a 19th-century ‘Swiss cabin’ and now museum, and the Roman School - a collection of art work by noted Roman artists. The grounds of the villa are also a large public park where on any day you can find picnics, a quick game of calcetto and sunbathers. For those who love architecture, the Quartiere Coppedè is a treasure trove of turn-of-the-century art nouveau buildings. It’s also worth a venture down Via XXI Aprile towards Piazza Bologna for a glimpse of Rome’s Fascist architectural history.

    Eating out

    Since the majority of its residents are Roman, Nomentano’s restaurants have historically catered to traditional Roman cuisine. Look for local pizza al taglio (pizza by the slice) shops, and Roman pizzerias like MangiaFuoco. Trattoria run through the neighbourhood, and a good local spot can be best found by word of mouth. Some of our favourites include Capoboi, a extraordinary fish-focused menu in the Coppedè area, and Piazza Bologna’s Ba Ghetto, which is an acclaimed kosher Roman restaurant whose successful sister eatery of the same name is in Rome’s historic ghetto.

    Part of Rome’s new craze are museum restaurants and Nomentano’s MACRO provides an excellent entry with MACRO 138, its rooftop restaurant. Don’t let a non-Roman menu put you off. If the pizzeria says napoletana, try it. Piazza Fiume claims the best kebab in Rome at the aptly named Kebab.

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